Ode to Alfalfa

alfalfa

alfalfa

With the noble and irrepressible plant, Alfalfa poised to be the next big recipient of Monsanto’s War on Life, It is little enough to recognize the character and contributions of this wonderful gift of the green Earth.

Millions Against Monsanto

Millions Against Monsanto

`

Event Information: Millions Against Monsanto Webinar: Why We Need a Truth-in-Labeling Campaign

Registration is required to join this event. If you have not registered, please do so now. Follow this link!

Ode to Alfalfa

Latin Name: Medicago sativa
Other Names: Buffalo herb, Lucerne, Purple Medic, Chilean clover, Lucerne grass, Chilean clover, Buffalo grass and my favorite, ‘Father of all Foods’.
The mutant-izing of alfalfa adds insult to injury for long time ‘health nuts’ (I’m one of the nuttiest).
Alfalfa was a staple in the whole foods movement and the health food stores in the early years (the middle of the 20th century). It has been a kind of a symbol of nutritional integrity and a link to the lineage of the human race. It is one of the oldest cultivated plants (charred seed of wild alfalfa have been identified in soil layers that date to about 6000 BC at Ali Kosh, in present-day southwestern Iran. And at Abu Hureyra, a very early agricultural community in Syria, charred remains of small seeded legumes date from about 10,000 BC… That’s old).
Consider the etymology, its name is derived from “al-fac-facah”, which means “father of all foods” in Arabic.
Alfalfa is loaded with concentrations of a broad range of nutritional constituents; valuable organic acids, free amino acids, non-protein amino acids, coumarins, isoflavonoids, saponins and phyto-steroids such as b-sitosterol, campesterol, stigamsterol, etc. Alfalfa also contains vitamins A, D, E and K, oceans of chlorophyll and carotenes, and is packed with food-form minerals such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium.

This hardy plant caught our attention a long time ago when we heard reports of the super-deep root system connecting alfalfa to the Earth. It’s just a cool thing; it’s a functionally meaningful attribute. There have always been reports of 120 foot deep alfalfa roots.

Beneath the lush green leaves of an alfalfa plant there really is a surprisingly large root system. Alfalfa roots grow about 6 feet per year in loose soil. Metabolically active alfalfa roots have been found (verifiably) beyond 60 feet deep. It is this large root system that is at the heart of the valuable traits of the crop. The ability of alfalfa roots to form an association with soil bacteria (Sinorhizobium meliloti) and “fix” atmospheric nitrogen into compounds that satisfy the nitrogen needs of the alfalfa crop, as well as the nitrogen needs of the following rotation crop, is well known. The ability to fix nitrogen also enables the plant to provide highly nutritional protein-rich green food. The deep root system allows alfalfa plants to access soil moisture that is not available to annual crops with shallow root systems, making alfalfa more drought-tolerant. Another function of alfalfa roots is to store carbohydrates produced in leaves so that plants can re-grow rapidly after harvest and green-up in early spring. As an added advantage, the extensive root system and early spring growth of alfalfa reduces soil and nutrient loss from nearby bare soil.

Reaching down six stories, a plant can access important, rare, micro-nutrient soil constituents. A mutant form of the plant of course will spread the integral perversions of ‘un-food’ deeply.

alfalfa

alfalfa


Alfalfa, as nature made it is a very cool plant, not too picky about where it grows, not to picky about the weather.

Health nuts have used ‘Alf’ as dried leaf, green drinks and tea; as alfalfa supplements such as tablets, capsules and extracts, various powerfully cleansing/healing high-chlorophyll preparations, topical healing poultices, wound packing and such, and of course the familiar fresh crispy sprouts; and numerous other forms.
It is also used in organic gardening. Alfalfa is typically used as a fertilizer since it adds value to the soil due to its nitrogen fixing attributes

alfalfa little rascals

alfalfa little rascals

Thank you Alfalfa for your many millennia of service and brotherhood, may you somehow survive Monsanto’s un-godly insults.

People, please actively boycott GMOs!

Thank you,

Billy

Leave a Comment


NOTE - You can use these HTML tags and attributes:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>